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8 Safe Ways to Burn Calories With Your Dog This Winter

Dog Slideshows

 

By Paula Fitzsimmons

 

Plunging temperatures give rise to pet hazards...

 

By Paula Fitzsimmons

 

Plunging temperatures give rise to pet hazards like frostbite, hypothermia, and paw pad injuries. But this doesn’t mean you and your canine companion have to be confined to the sofa all winter. With basic safety precautions, you can continue to burn calories this winter—and have fun while doing it.

 

Almost any activity can incorporate dogs, says Tricia Montgomery, founder of Chicago-based K9 Fit Club. “From walking, running, and swimming to hiking, boot camp, and yoga, all are a great way to get fit together and increase the human-animal bond.”

 

Here are eight safe ways you and your dog can keep moving all winter long. Remember to check with your veterinarian before starting a new exercise program with your dog. 

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6 Ways to Help Your Old Dog Feel Young

Dog Slideshows

 

By John Gilpatrick

 

When your dog starts to get up there in age, he...

 

By John Gilpatrick

 

When your dog starts to get up there in age, he slows down. Maybe he withdraws a bit. He might put on some weight—or lose some, depending on his eating and exercise habits and his health status.

 

The age at which “adult dogs” become “senior dogs” varies from breed to breed, and certainly some individuals will start to show the signs of age sooner or later than others. According to Molly Sumner, a New Jersey-based certified professional dog trainer and behavior consultant, many smaller breeds can live to 15 years and generally start to show their age between 9 and 11 years. Larger breeds have shorter life spans. They might live to just 8 or 10 years, and therefore, they become “senior” as early as 6 years old.

 

Regardless of age, as the dog’s caretaker, you owe it to him to make his golden years comfortable, healthy, and full of delight. Follow these six tips to help your older dog feel young.

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5 Ways to Treat Dog Dandruff

Dog Slideshows

 

By Elizabeth Xu

 

Dog dandruff can be distressing—it’s...

 

By Elizabeth Xu

 

Dog dandruff can be distressing—it’s not only unsightly, but it usually means something’s not quite right with your pup’s skin.

 

In fact, dandruff could be caused by a variety of things, including allergies, parasites, an illness, or food sensitivities, says Dr. Danel Grimmett of Sunset Veterinary Clinic in Oklahoma. “There are so many causes, but remember, dandruff should never be considered ‘normal,’” she says, noting that your veterinarian is the best person to help you determine why the dandruff is occurring.

 

Think your dog might have dandruff but you’re not sure? White flakes are one sign, says Jac Ciardella, a groomer and owner of The Pet Lodge in Rivervale, New Jersey. “The concentration [is usually] down the back and around the base of the tail,” he says. “Your pup’s coat can also become oily when it has dandruff.”

 

The best treatment will be based on what specifically is causing your pup’s dandruff, but these ideas for treating dog dandruff might help.

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