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7 Tips for Treating Cat Eye Infections

Cat Slideshows

 

By Kate Hughes

 

As with most feline ailments, recognizing when there...

 

By Kate Hughes

 

As with most feline ailments, recognizing when there is a problem is the first step in diagnosing and treating eye infections in cats. But, since many kitties can be very private—even more so when they’re not feeling well—having an idea of what could go wrong and how to fix it can be very helpful. Here are some tips that pet parents can use to keep their cats’ eyes bright and healthy.

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5 Types of Skin Cancer in Dogs

Dog Slideshows

 

By Joanne Intile, DACVIM

 

The skin is the largest organ of a dog,...

 

By Joanne Intile, DACVIM

 

The skin is the largest organ of a dog, and tumors affecting this structure are common. Between 60 to 80 percent of skin tumors in dogs are benign, meaning if you notice a lump on your dog’s skin, there’s a good chance it won’t be anything to worry about. However, the visible appearance of a growth can’t be used to predict whether it’s cancerous. Therefore, any new lump or bump you detect on your dog’s skin should be evaluated by a veterinarian.

 

Many skin tumors can be cured with early surgical removal. If a growth is removed from your dog’s skin, it should be submitted for evaluation by a veterinary pathologist. This is the best way to determine if further treatment is necessary. The following is a list of the more common skin tumors seen in dogs, along with basic information about their behavior and recommended testing and treatment options.

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6 Signs of Hip Dysplasia in Dogs

Dog Slideshows

 

By Mindy Cohan, VMD

 

Hip dysplasia is one of the most common skeletal...

 

By Mindy Cohan, VMD

 

Hip dysplasia is one of the most common skeletal disorders seen in dogs. The condition is characterized by a malformation of the coxofemoral (hip) joint.

 

Instead of the normal tight fit between the acetabulum (cup or socket) and femoral head (ball), patients with this condition suffer from a laxity within the joint. The malformation is a result of both genetic and environmental factors.

 

Hip dysplasia is seen more frequently in large breed dogs such as German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, St. Bernards, and Rottweilers. Although seen in smaller dogs, the prevalence is lower and the symptoms related to hip dysplasia are often less severe.

 

Recognizing the clinical signs of hip dysplasia is important for early intervention and pain mitigation. 

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