Cardiac Muscle Tumor in Cats

PetMD Editorial
January 05, 2009
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Rhabdomyoma in Cats

A rhabdomyoma is an extremely rare, benign, non-spreading, cardiac muscle tumor that occurs only half as often as its malignant version: rhabdomyosarcomas, an invasive, metastasizing (spreading) tumor.

Rhabdomyomas are usually found in the heart, and are suspected of being congenital in origin (present at birth). This type of tumor does not become malignant, nor does it metastasize through the body. They are very rarely found outside of the heart, but do occur in other places of the body on occasion. They have been reported in the ears of cats.

Rhabdomyomas can affect both cats and dogs. If you would like to learn more about how this disease affects dogs please visit this page in the PetMD pet health library.

Symptoms and Types

  • Rhabdomyoma in the heart:
    • Usually no symptoms
    • Rarely, there will be signs of right-sided congestive heart failure (CHF) due to obstruction
  • Rhabdomyoma outside the heart:
    • Localized swelling

 

Causes

Idiopathic (unknown).

Diagnosis

You will need to provide a thorough history of your cat's health leading up to the onset of symptoms. From there, your veterinarian will perform a complete physical exam on your pet, with a blood chemical profile, a complete blood count, a urinalysis, and an electrolyte panel. Your veterinarian will use the results of the bloodwork to confirm, or rule out, other diseases. Bloodwork will typically appear normal in patients with a rhabdomyoma, since the tumor is relatively harmless.

X-ray imaging, and an echocardiogram of the heart may help your veterinarian to diagnose a rhabdomyoma. Additional examination using an electrocardiogram will note heart arrhythmias (rhythm abnormalities). For a definitive diagnosis, an examination of tissue from the tumor (biopsy) can be performed.

Treatment

Treatment is not usually necessary for a rhabdomyoma in the heart, since surgery of the heart would carry more risk than any benefit it might provide. But for rhabdomyomas located in an area other than the heart, surgery to remove them should be fairly uncomplicated since they are not very invasive.

Living and Management

Your veterinarian will schedule monthly follow-ups for the first three months after your cat has been discharged in order to do progress checks. Follow-up visits may then be scheduled at three to six month intervals for another year. The concern is that rhabdomyomas in the heart may lead to right-sided congestive heart failure due to obstruction of blood flow.