breed

Skin Inflammation Due to Allergies (Atopy) in Cats

Atopic Dermatitis in Cats 

Atopic Dermatitis is an inflammatory, chronic skin disease associated with allergies. These allergic reactions can be brought on by normally harmless substances like grass, mold spores, house dust mites, and other environmental allergens. 

Furthermore, dogs are more prone to atopic dermatitis than cats. If you would like to learn more about how this disease affects dogs, please visit this page in the PetMD health library.

Symptoms and Types 

Often symptoms associated with atopic dermatitis progressively worsen with time, though they become more apparent during certain seasons. The most commonly affected areas in cats include the: 

  • Ears
  • Wrists
  • Ankles
  • Muzzle
  • Underarms
  • Groin
  • Around the eyes
  • In between the toes 

The signs associated with atopic dermatitis, meanwhile, consist of itching, scratching, rubbing, and licking, especially around the face, paws, and underarms.

Causes 

Early onset is often associated with a family history of skin allergies. This may lead the cat to become more susceptible to allergens such as:

  • Animal danders
  • Airborne pollens (grasses, weeds, trees, etc.)
  • Mold spores (indoor and outdoor)
  • House dust mite

Diagnosis
 

Your veterinarian will want a complete medical history to determine the underlying cause of the skin allergies, including a physical examination of the cat. Serologic allergy testing may be performed, but it does not always have reliable results. The quality of this kind of testing often depends on the laboratory which analyzes the results. Intradermal testing, whereby small amounts of test allergens are injected in the skin and wheal (a red bump) response is measured, may also used to identify the cause of your pet's allergic reaction.

 
1/2
  Next >