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Q. Home remedies for aging cats with azotemia ?

A. I notice your cat is a Persian, and I'm wondering if she has had an ultrasound done to look at her kidneys and perhaps diagnose the source of her azotemia? Persians frequently have a condition called polycystic kidney disease. The kidneys are misshaped, usually from birth, however the cat frequently doesn't become clinically ill or have azotemia until many years later.

Really, azotemia, which is the state of having elevated BUN and creatinine on lab work, can be caused by 3 things: dehydration, true renal failure or malfunctioning kidneys, and post-renal causes, which typically means there's something preventing the cat from eliminating urine (such as a stone in one of the ureters or the urethra.

Assuming your cat has true "renal" azotemia (because the treatments for the other 2 kinds involve addressing either the dehydration or the blockage), there aren't a lot of remedies, period - much less home remedies. The mainstay of therapy is a prescription diet low in phosphorus and protein, which is available from a vet. Some cats do well with fluids given subcutaneously (under the skin) at home - this helps keep them hydrated and helps the kidneys to function. And there are some supplements, although the true scientific proof that they help is lacking. They're called Azodyl and Renal Support.

If you want to talk more about your cat's particular situation we can consult about it.

Answered By
DR. CHRISTIE LONG, D.V.M., C.V.A.

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A. Azotemia, or a buildup of wastes in the blood, can be caused by a number of factors including kidney disease. Treatment from a veterinarian is required, and a vet will likely want to monitor your cat's levels over time to see if they improve. Depending on the cause, your vet may recommend a kidney friendly food or prescription diet that can be given at home to help the kidneys recover. Providing wet food and plenty of water can also help to keep the body hydrated and the kidneys filtering better. Your vet may also recommend subcutaneous fluids (or fluids given directly under the skin) at home, and can show you how to perform this procedure yourself at home if you wish to or need to try it.

Answered By
JESSICA L DESROSIERS

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