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Q. How can I tell if the antibiotics are working for my cats tail bite

A. You should start to see a decrease in swelling and discharge from the site of the wound, and it should be noticeably less painful. If things things aren't happening, it's possible the antibiotic being used isn't effective against the particular bacteria in the wound, or there's sufficient infection that the antibiotic can't penetrate into the tissue and be effective.

Answered By
DR. CHRISTIE LONG, D.V.M., C.V.A.

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