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Q. Dog is about 13. He isn't eating well, messing in the house, He has bumps all over (fatty tumors?) He sleeps a lot... Is it time 4 him to 2b put down

A. End of life discussions are tough. But the main thing to ask yourself is: How is my pets quality of life? Is it

a) Not too bad, he eats and drinks normal and has normal bowel movements. He is just a little slow getting around and sleeps a lot

b) He is severely debilitated (disabled) and unable to walk or stand for long periods of time but he still eats and drinks well.

c) He is severely debilitated but he is still eating and drinking and his mentation is good. He know who I am still and will show alertness when called.

a) and b) are up in the air. Pets can go either way and the choice is ultimately yours. But you have to ask yourself if your pets life is quality of life is so bad and cannot be managed well with any medical therapy that they would be more peaceful being humanely euthanized than to suffer another day. Unfortunately we have to make this choice for them, and it is never easy.

- Dr. H

Answered By
DESTINI R. HOLLOWAY, DVM

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A. Before you make the decision have your dog euthanised you should visit the vet with him. Old dogs sleep a lot, but that does not mean he is feeling bad,however he may be very stiff and have joint pain with arthritis. Your vet will check him out and can make him comfortable if that is the case. While old age slows down a dog, it per se is not a reason to put down the dog. Fatty tumors are not really debilitating unless they get so big that they become bothersome.

Answered By
DR. ANDREA M. BRODIE, DVM

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