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Q. My dog was bitten by a tick in Aug. She was seen by a vet and checked out ok. She is only 5, but her face has turned gray since then.

A. If is only where the tick was it may be related, to a scar, a blood test for tick borne diseases would also be recommended

Answered By
LINDSEY EDWARDS MVB, BSC, IVCA

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A. This may be normal age related changes. A tick bite or tick borne disease should not affect coat color.

Answered By
ANGEL ALVARADO

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