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Q. I was told by my vet that my dogs cherry eye was caused by something hitting his eye when he was poking around under a bush. I was told surgery needed

A. Prolapsed gland of the eyelid refers to a pink mass protruding from the animal's eyelid; it is also called a "cherry eye." Normally, the gland is anchored by an attachment made up of fibrous material. The most common sign of "cherry eye" is an oval mass protruding from the dogs's third eyelid. It can occur in one or both eyes, and may be accompanied by swelling and irritation. He may have acquired it by getting an injury to his eye but this isn't the case sometimes. Sometimes there is a weakness in the fibrous attachment.

The veterinarian will review the mass in the dog's third eyelid and determine if there is an underlying cause for the condition. The diagnosis of the prolapsed gland could be scrolled or everted cartilage in the third eyelid, abnormal cells in the third eye, or a prolapse of fat in the dog's eye.

Treatment often includes surgical replacement of the gland in the dog's eye, or removal of the entire gland if the condition is severe. Conversely, if medications are recommended, they are typically topical anti-inflammatory drugs that are effective in reducing swelling.

Answered By
DEBI MATLACK

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